Lyme Disease- “Under Our Skin Part 2: ‘Emergence'”

October 21, 2014 § Leave a comment

“Under Our Skin” and “Under Our Skin Part 2” are now available on DVD for those interested in learning more about Lyme Disease.

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Lyme disease, named after the towns of Lyme and Old Lyme, Connecticut, is not only native to the Northeastern United States. In fact, the disease has been reported in ALL US states (except Montana), as well as, in Scandanavia (Norway), Europe (Spain, France, Austria, and Germany), Canada, and Australia.

A new report from the Centers for Disease Control says that 300,000 Americans contract Lyme disease each year, which is TEN times more than previously admitted by health officials. This is also higher than HIV and breast cancer combined.

Ask anyone who has Lyme Disease, and they will tell you that it is a very complicated, complex, and often chronic disease that is easy to catch and difficult to diagnose and treat. First of all, diagnostic test results are often false positive. Secondly, long term antibiotics often don’t eradicate it. It may often be misdiagnosed as early ALS, Parkinson’s, Encephalitis, Lupus, Lymphoma, or MS, and many times doctor’s believe the patient’s are malingering or fabricating. Some patient’s have had unnecessary surgeries and organs removed. It is not uncommon to find that infectious disease specialists don’t know how to treat it. The incubation period from infection to the onset of symptoms is usually one to two weeks, but can be much shorter (days), or much longer (months to years). And, there is still controversy as to whether or not it can be transmitted via sexual contact or during pregnancy.

Things to consider if you suspect you or someone you know has been bitten by a tick, and is experiencing Lyme’s symptoms, ie. red bull’s eye skin rash, fever, chills, fatigue, body aches, joint pain, and headache:

You can not wait. Be seen by an Infectious Disease specialist as soon as possible. It will only get worse. If you aren’t feeling well, seek assistance as soon as possible.

There is a MD, PHD based out of Seattle, WA, Dr. Dietrich Klinghardt, who had Lyme’s himself, and understands naturopathic remedies as well.

http://www.klinghardtacademy.com/BioData/Dr-Dietrich-Klinghardt.html

In Germany, at the Inus Medical Center, there is a Lymphocyte Transformation Test that is 95% accurate at telling you what your levels are and what other bacterias you many also be carrying. Then the MD has a better understanding of what needs to be prescribed.

There are many strains of Lyme – Burgdorferi, Garinii, and Afzelii. This is important to know because each strain of Lyme tends to cause different problems in the body. Burgdorferi is known more for vascular and rheumatoid issues. Garinii causes cardiovascular problems and high blood pressure, and Afzelii impacts the central nervous system. Dr. Straube at the Inus Medical Center frequently sees patients with multiple strains of Lyme, including a mixture of Borrelia Burgdorferi, Afzelii, Garinii, Bavariensis, Spielmanii and Miyamotoi that is often misdiagnosed as lymphoma.

Climate change is one reason for this hybridization.
Previously Borrelias were confined to certain temperature ranges and habitats, but now with global warming, more bugs are found in more habitats, creating more complex forms of illness.

Apheresis treatment is NOT a cure, and consent needs to be obtained, but it removes the toxic protein that the Lyme can cause. The suggested amount is 2-4 treatments Tuesday and Thursday for one to two weeks (2 hours each treatment). Evidentally, it removes heavy metals and toxins from the blood like a filter.

The disease NEVER completely goes away, the trick is to keep
the immune system strong enough to keep the Lyme’s in a cage like a prisoner.

YOU TUBE: LYME NATION, Lymenation.net, and watch the documentaries, “Under Our Skin” Parts 1 and 2.

One World Cinema
http://1worldcinema.com

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